Martha Ffion Announces Debut LP; Shares ‘We Make Do’

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Irish-born, Glasgow-based singer-songwriter, Martha Ffion is set to release her debut LP Sunday Best early next year, through exceptional Welsh indie-label Turnstile Music.

Last we heard from Ffion was with wonderful debut EP, Trip about this time last year but she’s broken the silence with this album news which is accompanied by new, and lead single, ‘We Make Do’. It is a melodic piano-led pop song with a slight ’60s twist, as lush instrumentation combines with soft shakers, piano melodies and mellow acoustic guitars to create gentle surroundings for Ffion’s utterly compelling vocals; delivering detailed and uplifting lyrics. As ever, Martha Ffion beautifully crafted a wonderful, compelling and memorable song – delivered with aplomb. It is both familiar and warm; akin to being perched in front a glowing fire on the coldest of winter’s eves or an embrace from a cherished old friend.

You can listen to ‘We Make Do’ below – and keep an eye out for the LP in the new year – it promises to be a rather wonderful record.

Alan Maguire – ‘Time is Tension’

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‘Time is Tension’ is the latest single from Dublin producer/musician Alan Maguire.

There is a touch of the epic, dramatic even, as ‘Time is Tension’ simultaneously exudes an aura of ethereal wonderment and suspense building tension. A beautifully crafted exploration, it endeavors to enthrall and captivate, winging your thoughts a million miles away from the dullness of daily drabness. Crisp neon beats, phasing guitars and synths, and deep groove are expertly employed by Maguire to bring about an atmospheric, spacey-disco adventure. Delivered with a deft touch, pin point accuracy and flair for the atmospheric; this is a broody, thought-and-emotion evoking and immersive listening experience. In short; ‘Time is Tension’ will dramatically improve your day, no doubt about it.

Listen to ‘Time is Tension’ below and if that is to your liking, there’s plenty more where that came from, over here.

Incoming: A Quick Chat With Oh Boland

Oh Boland by Sean McCormack

Oh Boland by Sean McCormack

Oh Boland shall be brewing up a storm of a mastercful raw, noisy garage pop in BRÚ House, Newbridge on Friday, December 1 – fresh from doing the same across the other side of the Irish Sea.

This is the second in a series of collaborative shows between Broken Home & I, as we aim to bring some of our favourite musicians and artist to Newbridge – of which this line up comes up trumps for both of us.

Galway trio Oh Boland are one of the brightest talents to emerge from these shores. Their early EPs are superb and their 2016 debut LP, Spilt Milk is a treasure – and one of the finest records of recent times. The trio truly provide  a masterclass in raw, noisy garage pop that is ragged but irresistible, blasts of lo-fi goodness. Tunes trash, screech and rumble rumbustiously along, while brash it is, it is supremely catchy and mashed with earworm hooks. Here in lies the brilliance of their sound, traversing the space between brash and beautifully catchy. Oh Boland create something unique and special, perfection through imperfection if you will. Just superb.

Oh Boland join Silverbacks and Luke Redmond in BRÚ House, Newbridge this Friday, December 1, for what is a rather formidable lineup – Doors @ 9pm | Tickets (€5/€7) available here.

Ahead of the weekend’s show I caught up with Niall from Oh Boland for a quick chat….

Tell us a little bit about Oh Boland. How did it come about? And what is the essence/inspiration behind the project?

Hi Barry, how are you? Oh Boland are three wholesome shrubs from the verdant plains of Tuam county Galway. Roughly five years ago, I was a gormless dropout working in my Dad’s pub filling swill for fossils. I’d known Simon and Eanna since we were in our teens and so when their band broke up we started hanging out a lot and playing at the weekends in Simon’s house. All of this is probably an intolerable cliché so with any unfortunate reader in mind I won’t elaborate much further. Yeah, that’s how we started playing. With regard to essence or inspiration, I’m not sure. At this point I guess we try to make drunken, poppy, noise music or noisy, drunken, pop music. Those are the three constants in our lives.

After a long time trying to make it work, we finally got you to Newbridge. Are you excited to bring the Oh Boland show to town?

My grandfather is from Newbridge so I’m really excited to get back to the flesh and blood. Stephen of course who’s putting the show on has worked with us on some videos and is a good friend, looking forward to seeing him. My memory’s useless but I’m fairly sure this is our first time playing with Silverbacks too. We have seen them a few times and they’re super good and I’m really excited to be playing with them too.

What can we expect from an Oh Boland show?

Hmmm. Tough one. I think it’s got to the point where we barely know what to expect ourselves. Expect a healthy amount of new material at this point for sure. We’ve a new LP almost ready to go and the live set is often how we get the new stuff together. Otherwise, you can expect a slobbery gurgling bubble-gum punk mess. There’ll be a lot of oohs and aahs and unnecessary soloing. We’ll inevitably end up sounding like a cranked up showband trying to play the national anthem, slowly going down with the ship.

On the issue of touring, you toured the US last year; it would be interesting to hear your perspective on the differences (if any) between touring Ireland and the US?

I suppose it’s the same landscape you have to navigate in both instances. Ireland is way more manageable relatively speaking because it’s such a short run. It’s the blatantly obvious issue of size I suppose. In Ireland there are really only four or five towns to play all within four hours of each other. With America or the UK, you’re looking at stupid ferry routes, 13 hour drives etc. It only takes one day or one hour to break you when you’re crammed into a car with three people fermenting at a rapid pace with little food or sleep. I love touring though. For all the brutality you get to play every night which is the ultimate reward as well as meet every manner of sweetheart and weirdo the particular town has to offer. That makes the bodily aromas and marathon roadtrips easier to swallow for sure.

You’ve shared the bill with a number of legendary bands such as the Sonics and The Undertones, did they offer any sage advice or words of wisdom? What was it like to be that close to the origins of punk?

We’ve been really lucky over the last few years to be able to play with a lot of groups that have influenced us a lot over the years. Though none of the groups we’ve played with really spoke to us that much watching them play at such close quarters was more than enough. Standing barely off the stage watching Gerry Roslie scream is something I never thought I’d ever see.

In my humble opinion, Split Milk is one of the finest records of recent years. Tell us a wee but about making the album and were you happy with how it was received?

Thanks man. Glad you like it. At this point Spilt Milk is actually quite an old record in terms of the recordings themselves. We did the whole thing over Halloween weekend 2014 amazingly. The record was made with our long standing saviour Mark Chester of Ginnels, No Monster Club and Lie Ins fame. Everything since Delphi we’ve done with him and he’s always been really easy to work with. He listens to the same stuff as us and knows how we want to sound and how to get there. As for our approach to recording we like to do it pretty quick. This is mainly due to money and time, between getting time off work and not being able to fork out heavy currency for a studio. It also has a lot to do with the sound and performances too, to be able to just bash them out really quick with little time to be precious and second guess what you’re doing. I think though there is obviously a difference between onstage and recording the heart of a recording has to maintain a similar energy to the performances onstage. The heart of everything is cut live. The three of us in a room trying to wobble through the tune as best we can. I’ll add some extra guitars and that’s it. We do most of our recording as of late out in a cottage in Carraroe out in the wilderness. So that was it, two days out there running through the ten tunes and out the door again, sadly nothing worthy of a BBC4 documentary.

As for the reactions to the LP, yeah I’m fairly pleased. We are all really happy with how the record sounds and the experience making it and though I can’t really get my head around it people have been into it and that’s been really nice.

For me anyway, the brilliance of the Oh Boland sound is it simultaneously traverses a space between brash and beautifully catchy – is this a conscious thing or did it just sort of happen?

I suppose it’s somewhat conscious, a reflection of the weird extremes in our record collections. There was never a conscious decision to cross this with that. We were just bashing out what felt good in Simon’s garage. We all love 60’s music and 70’s power pop music. So you definitely have that element, but on the other hand we also love really loud abrasive sounds and it needs to be said that we’re also pretty sloppy musicians, particularly when we were starting out. So I suppose we started unwittingly trying to resolve the two extremes in the music and being so loose as musicians it just sort of came out the way it came out. As we’ve become tighter together musically it’s become more of a conscious thing.

What are you listening to at the moment?

I am listening to The World, Flesh World, Day Creeper, The Cowboys, the new Protomartyr LP, Rays, Arthur Russell, The Necessaries, Game Theory and Terry Allen in that order.

What are your plans for the rest of 2017 and 2018? Can we expect a new record soon?

We’ve a lot planned for next year. We are planning some trips over to the UK and a European tour in late spring as well as a return to the US late in the summer. We’ve also got a new LP almost finished which is going to be called Cheap Things and you can expect that sometime in the summer too.

And lastly, in all the interviews you’ve done is there anything you’re eager to address but no one ever asks you?

I can’t really think of anything right now. Leave that one with me.

Incoming: A Quick Chat With Silverbacks

 

Ireland's best 5-aside football team

Ireland’s best 5-aside football team

Silverbacks will be bringing their show to BRÚ House, Newbridge on Friday, December 1 – coinciding with the release of their latest single ‘Just for a Better View’.

This is the second in a series of collaborative shows between Broken Home & I, as we aim to bring some of our favourite musicians and artist to Newbridge – of which Silverbacks fits the bill for both of us.

Silverbacks have already eked out a solid rep for themselves when it comes to whipping up lashings of ’90s inspired lo-fi fuzz, a string of top class releases has ensured that.

Their slanted ’90s Pavement inspired sounds mix it up with the post-punk tones of Television and a touch of Talking Heads. Much like a Spring day, tunes like ‘Techno Dogs’, ‘Dirty Money’ and latest single ‘Just for a Better View’ are simultaneously gloomy and sun-kissed – in  LCD-meets-The Strokes kind of a way. I digress. The long and the short of it is that Silverbacks are one of the finest bands operating on these shores and in my humble opinion, one of Ireland’s best kept secrets.

Silverbacks join Oh Boland and Luke Redmond in BRÚ House, Newbridge this Friday, December 1, for what is a rather formidable lineup – Doors @ 9pm | Tickets €5/€7.

Ahead of the weekend’s show I caught up with Dan from Silverbacks, to shoot the shit.

Tell us a little bit about Silverbacks. How did it come about? And what is the essence/inspiration behind it?

Silverbacks started off as just Kilian and myself. We’ve been writing and recording demos for years and the end goal was always to eventually form a band and play them live.

Emma is on bass and has been playing with us for about four years now.

Last year Gary joined us on drums and Peadar on a guitar. This is the best live band we’ve had and as a result we’ve recently decided to take things a little more seriously.

In your opinion, what are the greatest challenges as an upcoming band in Ireland?

One obstacle is definitely that Ireland is an island. It makes playing gigs abroad trickier and more expensive, especially when you’re doing things yourself. It’d be nice if there were residencies for bands too.

Has growing up in Belgium had much influence on your musical output?

I don’t think so, well not yet anyway. Most of our influences are mainly American bands for the moment. But that could always change. In terms of the influence on my taste, I do have a soft spot for Jacques Brel and Kilian learned a good few Django Reinhardt chords and solos growing up.

One of my favourite songs is actually by a Belgian band called Deus, they were at their prime in the 90s. The song is called ‘Instant Street’ and my dad put it on a compilation tape for the car years ago . There’s a moment where Tom Barman (the singer) says the word ‘motherfucking’ and anytime my mother heard it she’d give out about the unnecessary rude language. My Dad would agree. Silverbacks have yet to use language that is deemed explicit in our songs so maybe there’s one obscure Belgian influence from my childhood.

What can we expect from a Silverbacks show?

Four friendly faces and Peadar.

Can you you tell us a bit about the Silverbacks artwork, and the artist involved?

It’s done by a good friend of ours who was in the same class as Kilian growing up and lived just down the road. He’s done all the artwork for Silverbacks over the last few years. We’re big fans of his work and we all feel the artwork he does for the band is a big part of Silverbacks.

You can check out his stuff here.

What are you listening to at the moment?

At this very moment I’m listening to the ‘Worst Case Scenario’ album by Deus.

One of my favourite bands currently is Happyness. I saw them play Whelans earlier this year and they were excellent. I’ve been revisiting some of the Sparklehorse albums too.

What are your plans for the rest of 2017 and 2018? Can we expect a new record soon?

We recently digitally released ‘Just for A Better View’. That’s the first song we didn’t record or mix ourselves. Stephen from Lamplight Studios had us around and we’re really happy with the results. We plan to record one more song at Lamplight before the end of the year.

For 2018 we’re hoping to start playing shows on a more regular basis. An album would be nice too but who knows, we’re currently sitting on a lot of demos.

And lastly, in all the interviews you’ve done is there anything you’re eager to chat about but no one ever asks you?

Not really Barry, we probably haven’t done enough interviews.

Super Extra Bonus Party Return with Scintillating New Single ‘Switzerland’

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Super Extra Bonus Party are a band that will always have a special place in my heart. Not only was their music the soundtrack to a lot of great times, SEBP gigs were always superb, thrilling and often chaotic, and the source of fun times and great memories.

Add to that, they were one of a few Irish bands who did things their own way, not playing the game (whatever the game is) and experimenting without any pretentious bullshit. Needless to say, it was more than a mild disappointment when SEBP parked the project, announcing an indefinite hiatus seven long years ago.

Oh, and in case you’ve missed it, Super Extra Bonus Party have called time on their break with their new single ‘Switzerland’ – and it is a sensational return. It’s not a million miles away from where they left off their criminally underrated second album from 2009, Night Horses. Embracing SEBP’s characteristic strength of live instrumentation meets electronics, it is propelled by a powerful, hypnotic pulsing synth and metronomic beat, injected with meaty guitars, an intense drum machine work-out and all manner of electronic wizardry. ‘Switzerland’ is instilled with an energy that feels electric as it charges forth to a cataclysmic wall of sound. Opting in favour of keeping vocal duties in-house with Gavin Elsted & Stephen Fahey is a revelation too – sublime!

SEBP were always one’s for pushing things, experimenting and avoiding the obvious, safe path. The same can be said for ‘Switzerland’, and I think you’ll agree when I say, it’s great to have them back.

You can get yourself acquainted with ‘Switzerland’ below & the single is out now on 045 Recordings.

Earlier in the week, the band at down with with Headstuff to discuss their feelings about everything that had gone before, read it here – it’s definitely worth some of your time.