Sprints – ‘The Cheek’

Sprints are Dublin-based post-punk foursome of Karla Chubb (vocals/guitar), Colm O’Reilly (guitar), Sam McCann (bass) and Jack Callan (drums).

Together, Sprints create a raw, raucous and potent post-punk sound – one filled with a ferocious blend snarling vocals, driving rhythms, meaty riffs, swagger and noise. The aforementioned attributes are captured perfectly by their latest single ‘The Cheek’; re-released as part of  Nice Swan Records’ monthly singles club. ‘The Cheek’ is loud, confident, and defiant. Driven by a fierce and propulsive bass line, it grabs you from the off and refuses to relent as it swaggers along barrelling drumbeat. Guitars rumble, buzz and crunch amidst the hail of noise and feedback as Chubb’s vocals increase their bite, growing increasingly defiant, leading the charge to an electrifying climax. A huge, thrilling and furious jam, delivered with a swagger and laced with sarcasm, ‘The Cheek’ tackles sexuality head on.

An absolutely massive tune, listen ‘The Cheek’ below:

Eoin Dolan – ‘June Hope’

Whenever Galway musician and singer-songwriter Eoin Dolan, one of Ireland’s finest talents as it goes, releases new material it is a great day.

Following on from last year’s Commander of Sapiens – Dolan’s third album to date – new EP June Hope is a gentle, carefully crafted collection of psych-inflected indie-pop. Dolan has a remarkable ability for crafting sci-fi-tinged surf pop, marrying heartbreaking melodies and gentle instrumentation, sadness with beauty and interstellar psych-pop exploration – and this signature sound is all over ‘June Hope’. Breezy, light and thoughtful, it charts a journey from youth to young adulthood through the prism of seasonal change. It is woozy and dreamy as it drifts along a gently waltzing groove flanked by Dolan’s breezy air and twinkly guitar, while radiating a sense of hopeful optimism. As always, Dolan has delivered an absolute treasure.

Listen to the single below and check out the David Boland aka New Pope crafted video – the EP is here too.


FONDA – ‘No Begonias’

It’s been four years since we’ve heard new material from Irish post-punk outfit FONDA but the intervening period was anything but boring.

Lead singer and frontman Liam O’Connor did a stint with brilliant Limerick post-punk powerhouse Slow Riot through to their conclusion and subsequent posthumous album release, while Patrick Bourke & Laura Kelly left for pastures new in North America.

All that aside, O’Connor and FONDA are back with a new line-up featuring fellow Limerick musicians; John Ahern (Hey Rusty), Paul Cosgrave (Slow Riot) and Sean O’Mahony (Inner City Radio) and the first fruits from this new formation comes in the shape of powerful new single ‘No Begonias’. It is a huge and epic post-punk anthem with dark and dramatic vocal soaring stridently above as urgent guitars burn, riffs surge with intense and searing intensity, and meaty basslines relentless rhythm reverberate amid the distortion below. A gripping, insistent and emotionally charged post-punk fervour – a triumphant return from FONDA.

Listen to ‘No Begonias’ below:

Martha Ffion Announces New Album; shares ‘After the Fact’

Glasgow-based Irish singer-songwriter Martha Ffion (aka Claire McKay) has returned with a wonderful new single ‘After the Fact’.

Working with the excellent Lost Map Records again, ‘After the Fact’ is the first taste of from her forthcoming much-anticipated second album Nights to Forget, which will be released on August 14, 2020.

Ffion’s 2018 debut LP Sunday Best is a beautiful record, filled with gleaming guitar-pop, wistful-ballads, swooning sixties inspired indie-pop and touches of folk & country, and being as it was one the finest records of that year, the expectancy levels for its follow-up are set rather high. New single ‘After the Fact’ is magnificent; it is a glorious ray of gleaming indie-pop with an underbelly of melancholy and disquiet. A fractured pop song, Ffion’s honeyed lilting vocal is juxtaposed by the stuttering groove interspersed with angular riffs and stabs of off-kilter guitar, and the results are a glorious. This captures all that is greatest about Martha Ffion’s work in just three-and-a-half-minutes – a marvelous songwriting wrapped with bittersweet indie-pop.

Check out the new single below – and keep the eyes peeled for the new record coming in August:


The Pickled Onions – ‘Habbit Holes’

Dublin outfit The Pickled Onions aka Paddy McGovern has quite a knack for bright, breezy and joyous bouts of effervescent indie-pop.

McGovern already has two wonderful EPs under his belt – The Woods & The Mines – and he is back with a new (and equally enchanting) single called ‘Habbit Holes’. It is sweet and charming three-minute escape to a woozy world of peaceful tranquility. Radiating a floaty, carefree and daydream vibe, lush hazy vocals drift over a gentle strum, playful melody, colourful tones and psych brush strokes – while the rhythm is seductive and delivered with a pillowy soft fluffiness. A soothing and breezy tune, marked with hint of wistfulness and nostalgia, but filled dreamy vibes an irresistible charm – simply divine.

Listen to  ‘Habbit Holes’ below: 

Junk Drawer – ‘What I’ve Learned / What I’m Learning’

Junk Drawer have been creating unruly blasts of sonic fury since 2016 but the Belfast quartet are releasing their debut album Ready for the House this coming Friday (April 24th) via Art For Blind.

Ahead of the album’s arrival comes new single, and the album’s opening salvo, ‘What I’ve Learned / What I’m Learning’. Mixing it up with brush strokes of psych, post-punk, 90s indie, shoegaze, psych and post-punk Junk Drawer deliver a sprawling 7 minutes of relentless, frenzied delirium. Opening with a meandering array of slowburning guitars and riffs that melt the heart before subtly drifting away as rampaging rhythm, caustic guitar lines and barrage of relentless roar of searing riffs emerge through a swell of distortion, feedback and psychedelic drones. It is a raw and caustic thriller, an unrelenting electrifying juggernaut of a jam that screeches through serrated layers of sonic energy, squealing distortion and spiraling fuzz. As was previously stated, this is the album opener, and oh my, does this get you in the humour for the album. Yes sir. 

Taken from Junk Drawer’s debut LP Ready For The House, out April 24 via Art For Blind Records.

Ex Norwegian – ‘Jove Was At Home’

Miami Beach psych-rockers Ex Norwegian are spending their 2020 releasing new music almost every Friday, mostly obscure covers of favourites, like this one from Irish psych-folk troupe Dr. Strangely Strange’s 1971 track ‘Jove Was At Home’

The original, a gentle, playful and pristine psych-folk jaunt is afforded an electric make-over into a psych stomper. While retaining the sweetness and melody of the original, this re-imagining it saunters along a swaggering groove and stomping beat amid a heady haze of warm fuzz and distortion as guitars buzz, riffs fizz and fuzz with hazy, nonchalant vocals loom large in the background. A superb and very easy on the ear tune, this is one of the more unusual things to cross my path recently but a welcome one at that. I had the pleasure of seeing Dr. Strangely Strange live a few years back (on my Dad’s recommendation who is a big fan) and they were really enjoyable. 

Listen to Ex Norwegian do Dr. Strangely Strange and ‘Jove Was At Home’ below:



Jinx Lennon Shares ‘North Louth’; New Album Out Now

Jinx Lennon is a unique talent – a national treasure to be exact – and one of Ireland’s most insightful songwriters who is influenced as much by hip hop and post-punk, Jinx is the embodiment of a modern folk singer. 

Whether it is an acoustic guitar or sampled disco beat, raw garage noise or breakbeats his are songs of raw truth that push us to confront uncomfortable home truths in our society while kicking back against the humdrum bullshit of the modern world. Jinx’s new album Border Schizo Fffolk Songs for the Fuc**d was released on Friday last, and came accompanied by single ‘North Louth’. The tune, and the video, are immense. ‘North Louth’ is a hard-edged tune but one that has more than modicum of infectious allure, not to mention extremely danceable. While bristling with rawness as Jinx delivers his powerful lyrics in his distinct and brilliant manner, fizzing synths, frazzled electronics and break-beat add the dancey grooves.  Jinx Lennon’s music isn’t for everyone, sure but there is no one else quite like him and it hard to be unique nowadays but Jinx does it with ease and is searingly brilliant as always.

Border Schizo FFFolk Songs For The Fuc**d is out now – watch the superb video for ‘North Louth’ below:

Imploded View – ‘Don’t Know What To Call This Feeling’

It’s been a while since we’ve heard from Irish producer Imploded View (aka Jerome McCormick) – and mores the pity.

A longtime favourite around these parts, whether bestowing elegantly sculpted downtempo soundscapes or buoyant electro, the Longford-based producer never disappoints. In keeping with tradition Imploded View has come bouncing back into our lives with a lavish slice of the latter in the shape of ‘Don’t Know What To Call This Feeling’. Built around a funky synth and bass, the allure of the groove runs deep to the core as catchy hooks, warm shimmers of synth and cascading frazzled electronics illuminate a path for this funk-filled strut. Amid the bright and bouncy jaunty air, a pang of unease emerges through a wining string line grounds us an the hushed vocals from McCormick which offer introspective exploration marked by a raw and redemptive tone. A marvelous tune, musically and thematically. Welcome back!

Check out ‘Don’t Know What To Call This Feeling’ below and it’s worth mentioning that much of the video was actually shot by McCormick’s six-year-old daughter. Enjoy!


TV People – ‘Kitchen Sinking’

TV People are post-punk foursome – Paul Donohoe, Brendan Clarke, Len Rochford & Rob Kavanagh – from Dublin.

Since their formation in early 2019, the band spent the year honing and refining their sound, and they are kicking off 2020 in style with new single ‘Kitchen Sinking’. While channelling classic post-punk influences, their musings also owe a debt to garage, indie and punk. The single is a bold and peerless bout of slowburning aggression that thrives on the darker side of post punk. Amid burning intensity, ‘Kitchen Sinking’ trundles along driving, meaty basslines with burning guitars and glistening riffs over a rumbling rhythm and skittish groove as raw yet semi-hushed vocals stride above. ‘Kitchen Sinking’ is a massive tune, packed with power and emotion, and one that is utterly superb.

Check ‘Kitchen Sinking’ out below: